Me and My Murse

When I lived in America, I looked a lot different. I dressed better, and my clothes were washed by machine rather than hand. My feet were clean, and my face was less greasy and blemished. I was rarely sweaty. In a nutshell, I was more attractive.

In America, I did what every other guy did: I carried my wallet in my back pocket. Here, that is not an option. Theft is not something that happens every day in Senegal, but it does happen, and of course foreigners are targets because they have money. I learned during training to carry my wallet in my front pocket because it’s less accessible. I did this for a little bit, but I started getting frustrated when I would forget this and that. In addition, change is really important in CFA (the Senegalese currency). You end up carrying a lot of coins around, which jangle and leave bulges in your pockets.

So after a few months, I did what all grandmothers do and bought a change purse. Mine was purchased at an artisan fair in Dakar. It’s green and small, and I love it. It’s very convenient.

I thought the change purse would solve my problems. I thought it would organize and streamline my pockets. I still wasn’t satisfied though. I had my wallet in one pocket, my change purse in another, and my cell phone in a third. My pants were getting out of hand.

So finally I caved. I decided to man up and buy a MURSE. For those old folks who don’t know what a murse is (aka my Dad), it is a portmanteau for MAN PURSE. For those slow people who don’t know what a portmanteau is (aka a lot of people), look it up.

I was hesitant at first because I didn’t know what people would think of my murse (both volunteers and Senegalese nationals alike), but it has been almost a year since I rocked my first one, and I have never looked back.

My murse has changed my life. I carry all sorts of wonderful things in it. There is a list of things that are always in my murse, and today I would like to share that list with you. Let’s stop chatting and dive right in, shall we?

1. My wallet: of course my wallet is in there. I carry my wallet with me everywhere. It holds my money and my Peace Corps ID, which are both very important. There is a law in Senegal where you can’t walk around without proper identification. Basically, they can arrest you if you’re found without an ID. Foreigners should carry their passports, but Peace Corps volunteers can get by with carrying their ID card.

2. My change purse: as previously mentioned, I own a change purse. It holds all my coins, which are crucial in this country.

3. A book: the pace of this country is as frustrating as an episode of Lost. I always have a book with my in case I have to wait around, which happens often. I have read my book in all sorts of places: the post office, Senelac (where I pay my electricity bill), every mode of transportation I’ve ever taken, every restaurant in Sokone, etc.

4. Sunscreen: the African sun is brutal. The bottle currently in my murse is the one I brought to this country from America. I ran out of the stuff Peace Corps gave me. Thanks Publix for protecting my toubab skin.

5. Chapstick: the chapstick I carry in my murse is always SPF during the day. At night, I used medicated from the States.

6. Cell phone: my link to the outside world (and to other English speakers). Text messages are 20 CFA, which is around three cents. International texts are 100 CFA, which is around 20 cents. I can call volunteers for free, but it costs money to call Senegalese people.

7. Keys: to my room in Sokone.

8. Hand sanitizer: this country is dirty. I was always paranoid about germs, but since I got pink eye, I am overly cautious. Annoyingly, Peace Corps does not provide hand sanitizer, so it’s always good to include a few bottles in packages (hint hint).

So there you have it. Above is the list of things I carry with me on my person at pretty much all times. When I’m done with Peace Corps and this mess is all over, I probably won’t attempt to rock the murse stateside. I don’t think the American people are ready for me and my murse.

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    • Fenella
    • October 9th, 2011

    Some useful information for my impending visit. Thanks. I’ve got everything I need hopefully. Linz and I are doing a dry-run packing session tonight to see what will fit in the bag. If i can fit any extra, will bring hand sanitizer for you.

    Also, I carry a satchel around with me all the time. http://www.glenalmond.com/shop/acatalog/SENECA.html It’s bigger than your murse, but it holds all sorts of my things, my diary (as in appointments, etc.), lotion, chapstick, hand sanitizer, tissues, change, wallet, bus tickets, bobby pins for shaggy bangs in the eyes, book, magazines, papers i should be dealing with but am procrastinating, pens, postcards, stamps, feminine item, umbrella, and then on top of that the odd assortments of everyday life.

    It’s not a girly thing by anymeans and I would recommend a nice manly looking satchel for everyday life in the USA.

    • Lindsey
    • October 9th, 2011

    Yes, very useful post for me too. I’m off to scavenge up a change purse. CANNOT WAIT to see you!

    • B
    • October 18th, 2011

    murse right, not fanny pack? bc the disney world #1 accessory is not okay. in any country.<3 you!

    • Sca-rah
    • October 19th, 2011

    Quote of the post, “My pants were getting out of hand.”

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